The Core Conflict Leads to Undesired Effects

You can combine the three conflicts to obtain the underlying core conflict leading to all three. Since the conflicts derive from the three starting UDEs, resolving the core conflict should have a desirable impact on all three of the UDEs analyzed. Since the project system is a connected system, the core conflict may contribute to the other UDEs as well.

Figure 3.13 illustrates development of the core conflict. The goal of the three conflicts is common: project success. The top path of the cloud illustrates the logic that leads each individual to work toward his/her own success. In order to have a task successful project, each task must perform as planned. In order for each task to perform as planned, each task performer must do whatever individual task success demands.

The lower path illustrates the logic that leads to working toward project success. In order to have the project succeed each part of the project must contribute to overall project success. In order to contribute to overall project success, each task must subordinate to the overall project.

This core conflict is the common conflict referred to by Deming, where working for each part of the system does not lead to an effective system. It is the conflict identified as a principle in TOC: in an optimum system, each part of the system cannot perform at optimum. Worse yet, the core conflict sets up a win-lose situation between all of the project workers and project management. No wonder projects are so stressful to all concerned. No wonder so many projects fail.

Figure 3.14 illustrates how the core conflict leads to all of the UDEs. This implies that the core conflict is a high-leverage part of the project system. A solution (new theory) that resolves the core conflict differently can influence the whole system in a way that tends to move the UDEs toward their desirable counterparts.

LKeep my delivery _commitment

C C2 I Reduce the critical ^ path time

Demonstrate can-do attitude

Demonstrate individual success

Satisfy clients and management by delivering the most scope for the least cost in the shortest time

C3 Meet my commitments B2

Contribute to early completion

Reduce the critical path time

Figure 3.13 The core conflict underlies all three conflicts.

Figure 3.13 The core conflict underlies all three conflicts.

| Include contingency | in task times

Do not turn in work | early

| Include contingency | in task times

Do not turn in work | early

Accept new tasks

Include contingency in each task estimate

Include contingency in each task estimate

Do not include contingency

Do not include contingency

The logic illustrated by Figure 3.14 is incomplete. It is only a notional connection between some part of the core conflict and the UDE. Chapter 11 illustrates more of the complete logic underlying these connections, and you can find the complete CRT at http://www.Advanced-projects.com. At this point, if you accept that the core conflict underlies most or all of the UDEs of the project system, you may be willing to consider the beginning of the solution direction.

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Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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