Project costs

Table F. 11 Calculating the cost of Amanda's project

Analyst

Daily cost <£)

Days Required

Cost (£)

Amanda

300

no*

33.000

Belinda

250

50

12.500

Torn

175

25

4.375

Daisy

225

27

6.075

Gavin

150

30

4.500

Purdy

150

28

4.200

Justin

150

15

2.250

Spencer

150

25

3.750

Daily oncost

200

100

20.000

Total

90.650

• This includes 10 days for pre-project planning and post project review.

• This includes 10 days for pre-project planning and post project review.

Calculating the distribution of costs over the life of the project is best done as a per week or per month figure rather than as daily costs. The expenditure per week for Amanda's project is shown as a chart in Figure 8.9.

9.1 Lines of code as a partial task completion indicator

9.2 Revising the timeline chart

There are many reasons why the proportion of lines coded is not a good indicator of completeness. In particular, you should have considered the following:

• the estimated total number of lines of code might be inaccurate;

• the lines of code so far written might have been easier, or harder, to write than those to follow ;

• a program is not generally considered complete until it has been tested - when l(X)% of its lines of code have been w ritten a program w ill still be incomplete until tested.

With more knowledge of what has been done and what is left to complete it might be possible to make a reasonable estimate of completeness. Breaking the development task into smaller sub-tasks such as software design, coding and unit testing might be of some assistance here.

At the end of week 8. the scheduled completion dates for drafting and issuing the tender need to be revised - note both need to be changed since they are both on the critical path (Figure F.I I).

Planned Tim©

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Planned Tim©

Figure F.I 1 The revised timeline chart.

Subsequently. Brigetie needs to show only the completion of each of these two remaining activities on the timeline chart - the project being completed by the Thursday of week 11 (Figure F.I2).

It should be apparent from Figure 9.12 that the initial activity, specify overall 9.3 Amanda's system. has slipped by one day. It may not be quite so obvious from Figure 9.12 earned value alone what else has happened to her project - inspection of Figure 9.12 and analysis Table 9.2 should, however, make it possible to see that specif)- module I) has taken 2 days longer than forecast and specify module B has taken 5 days longer. Thus, the project has earned 34 workdays by day 35. 49 workdays by day 52 and 64 workdays by day 55.

From Figure 9.12 it is not possible to deduce the underlying causes of the slippage or to forecast the consequences for the project. The use of earned value analysis for forecasting is described later in Section 9.6.

9.4 The effects Of Among the items most likely to he affected by the change are test data, expected specification results and the user handbooks.

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