Figure Thirty Four Competencies that Every Software Project Manager Needs to Know

Software

Project

Management

Product

Project

People

1,

ASHSiiEifig prOCESüFR,

12.

Ruildng a work hreakcicwn

23-

Appraising performance

2.

Awareness of pjoccss standards

Mmcura

24

Handling intellectual property

3.

□ctimng tho product

13.

Documenting pians

25

holding oHective meetings

A.

Evaluating airar nativa process-si

H.

Estimating c'jal

26

Inleratlion an J communication

5.

Managing requ rem-ent&

15.

Etlfmeftlno effgri

27

Leadership

&

Manggcng subcontractors

ltf.

Managing :isks

28

Managing change

7.

Heriorming the Initial assessment

17.

Momlonng development

23

Negolifilmg successiuliy

B.

3g ccNrg rralhodü 3rd tOQlQ

1 B.

Scheduling

30

Planning c;uecrs

9-

T.nlsri-iç) procESSES

19.

Selecting metrics

31

Presenl ng effectively

10.

Tracking prcKJud quatilv

M.

Selecting project

32

Recruiting

11

UndwElandlng development

management tools.

33

Selecting a team

actiMïtiôÈ

21.

Truckmy prûCèâs

34.

Têambuilding

22.

Tracking projeçl progress

The remainder of this introductory chapter will discuss each of these categories in more detail, while chapters in the sections that follow will show how to use each skill in practical situations. Many of these techniques and skills will be further illustrated in sidebar stories and anecdotes.

Product Development Techniques

1. Assessing processes— Defining criteria for reviews

2. Awareness of process standards— Understanding process standards

3. Defining the product— Identifying customer environment and product requirements

4. Evaluating alternative processes— Evaluating various approaches

5. Managing requirements— Monitoring requirements changes

6. Managing subcontractors— Planning, managing, and monitoring performance

7. Performing the initial assessment— Assessing difficulty, risks, costs, and schedule

8. Selecting methods and tools— Defining selection processes

9. Tailoring processes— Modifying standard processes to suit a project

10. Tracking product quality— Monitoring the guality of an evolving product

11. Understanding development activities— Learning the software development cycle Project Management Skills

12. Building a work breakdown structure— Building a WBS for a project

13. Documenting plans— Identifying key components

14. Estimating cost— Estimating cost to complete the project

15. Estimating effort— Estimating effort reguired to complete the project

16. Managing risks— Identifying and determining the impact and handling of risks

17. Monitoring development— Monitoring the production of software

18. Scheduling— Creating a schedule and key milestones

19. Selecting metrics— Choosing and using appropriate metrics

20. Selecting project management tools— Knowing how to select project management tools

21. Tracking processes— Monitoring compliance of project team

22. Tracking project progress— Monitoring progress using metrics People Management Skills

23. Appraising performance— Evaluating teams to enhance performance

24. Handling intellectual property— Understanding the impact of critical issues

25. Holding effective meetings— Planning and running excellent meetings

26. Interaction and communication— Dealing with developers, upper management, and other teams

27. Leadership— Coaching project teams for optimal results

28. Managing change— Being an effective change agent

29. Negotiating successfully— Resolving conflicts and negotiating successfully

30. Planning careers— Structuring and giving career guidance

31. Presenting effectively— Using effective written and oral skills

32. Recruiting— Recruiting and interviewing team members successfully

33. Selecting a team— Choosing highly competent teams

34. Teambuilding— Forming, guiding, and maintaining an effective team Views of the competencies throughout the book:

® Chapters are pegged to the sequence of activities in a software life cycle.

® Every chapter in this book will begin by describing when (in what phase or phases) the subject matter will be used during the SLC. For example, Chapter 16, "Eliciting Requirements," points out that this activity occurs primarily in the requirements phase, although it may begin as early as the concept exploration phase and continue through the design phase.

® Multiple competencies are addressed in each chapter. One or more of the 34 competencies will be most important to the subject of a chapter. In Chapter 16 the focus is on the skills of managing requirements, estimating cost, estimating effort, and presenting effectively, although others may be touched upon.

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Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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