Endnotes

Saaty, Thomas L. (1990). "Multicriteria Decision Making." The Analytic Hierarchy Process: Planning Priority Setting, Resource Allocation, Volume I, AHP Series, extended edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

^ previous

* previous

Chapter 6. Selecting a Project Team

The selection of a project team occurs early in the life cycle of a software development project. The selection of team members, the stages of team building that occur, and the way in which the team morphs all support and affect the remainder of the activities in the life cycle. The information presented in this chapter forms the background needed to fully understand how individual personalities affect the ability of a team to create positive synergy.

Many project teams exhibit behavioral characteristics of a single personality. Some are productive, some are seemingly dysfunctional, and others exhibit wide mood swings. The manifestation of a team's character is based on the dynamics of the team members—the emergent personality critically affects the accomplishment of project goals. Team members may be added or deleted as the project leader discovers conflicts, but such changes come with a price: Any change in membership will require the group to go through team formation stages all over again before the team can perform.

A team personality is complete with spoken and unspoken rules and constantly shifting relationships. As new members join the team and existing ones depart, the character of the team changes. It may also change as the project moves through the phases of its life cycle. A dominant personality (or two) usually emerges soon after formation, and the dynamics of the workgroup change overtime. As the project progresses through initial stages of confusion and later stages of ideal cooperation, the leader must recognize the signs of dysfunctionality and act accordingly to halt the unwelcome transformation. This is no simple task because the human personality is far more complex than any science or technology rooted in physics. Yet, if left unattended, the negative aspects of clashing personalities can wreak havoc on the project and sometimes destroy individual team members.

Chapter 29, "Reporting and Communicating," will describe communication aspects of a project team;Chapter 25, "Project Tracking and Control," will discuss how to track team progress. Selecting the right team members and correctly building the team at the beginning of the project life cycle will facilitate these skills. To understand how to apply leadership to project teams, we'll first explore individual uniqueness, then project team dynamics, and, finally, specific leadership techniques.

* previous

* previous

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment