Identifying activities

Oou Course Outlines

Essentially there are three approaches to identifying the activities or tasks that make up a project - we shall call them the activity-based approach, the product-based approach and the hybrid approach. The activity-based approach The activity-based approach consists of creating a list of all the activities that the project is thought to involve. This might involve a brainstorming session involving the whole project team or it might stem from an analysis of similar past projects. When listing...

Identifying resource requirements

Identify Required Resource

The first step in producing a resource allocation plan is to list the resources that w ill be required along with the expected level of demand. This w ill normally be done by considering each activity in turn and identifying the resources required. It is likely, however, that there will also be resources required that are not activity specific but are part of the project's infrastructure (such as the project manager) or required to support other resources (office space, for example, might be...

Step Identify project infrastructure

Projects are rarely initiated in a vacuum. There is usually some kind of existing infrastructure into which the project can fit. The project leader who does not already know about this structure needs to find out its precise nature. Some of the issues of strategic planning are addressed m Chapter 3. Step 2. 7 Identify relationship between the project and strategic planning As well as identifying projects to be carried out, an organization needs to decide the order in which these projects are to...

Step Analyse project characteristics

Project Management Step Step Slides

The general purpose of this part of the planning operation is to ensure that the Chapter 4 elaborates on appropriate methods are used for the project. the process of analysing Step 3. Distinguish the project as either objective- or product-driven This has already been discussed in the first chapter. A general point to note is that as system development advances, it tends to become more product-driven, although the underlying objectives always remain and must be respected. Step 3.2 Analyse other...

Introduction to Step Wise project planning

This chapter describes a framework of basic steps in project planning and control upon which the following chapters build. There arc many different techniques that can be used in project planning and this chapter gives an overview of the points at which these techniques can be used during project planning. Chapter 4 will illustrate how different projects need different approaches, but this framework should always apply to the planning process used. The framework described is called the Step...

Problems with over and underestimates

A project leader such as Amanda will need to be aware that the estimate itself, if known to the development team, will influence the time required to implement the system. An over-estimate might cause the project to take longer than it would otherw ise. This can be explained by the application of two laws . Parkinson's Law 'Work expands to fill the time available9, which implies that given an easy target staff will work less hard. Brooks' Law The effort required to implement a project will go...

Evaluating risks to the schedule

Estimate Completion Formula

We have seen that not all risks can be eliminated - even those that are classified as avoidable or manageable can. in the event, still cause problems affecting activity durations. By identifying and categorizing those risks, and in particular, their likely effects on the duration of planned activities, we can assess what impact they are likely to have on our activ ity plan. We will now take a look at two methods for assessing the effects of these uncertainties on the project schedule. Using...

Function point counting Fixed price per unit delivered contracts

Was discussed in This is often associated w ith function point I-P counting. The size of the system Chapter 5. to be delivered is calculated or estimated at the outset of the project. The size of the system to be delivered might be estimated in lines of code, but FPs can be more easily and reliably derived from requirements documents. A price per unit is also quoted. The final price is then the unit price multiplied by the number of units. Table 10.1 shows a typical schedule of prices. Table...