Info

architecture-first approach, 63, 64, 68,

118,119,231,233,234 change management environment, 63, 64,

67, 232, 233,234 component-based development, 33, 63,

64, 68,231,233 configurable process, 65, 67, 232, 233 demonstration-based approach, 65, 68,

119,232,233 evolving levels of detail, 65, 67, 232, 233, 234

iterative life-cycle process, 63, 64, 67,119, 231,233

model-based notation, 65, 68, 232, 233, 234

objective quality control, 65, 68,232,233, 234

round-trip engineering, 47, 64, 68, 119, 173-174, 232,233 Modularity metric, 197, 286, 292, 296, 343-344

MTBF and maturity metric, 198-199

Next-generation software economics, 237-245

Objective quality control, 65, 68, 232, 233, 234

Object-oriented methods, 36-37 Off-the-shelf products, 39-40 Organization environment, 183-184 Organization policy, 181-183

Peer inspections, 51-53 Process automation, 167-185 discriminants, 209-218

improvement, 40-43, 59, 352-353,

363-390 instrumentation, 187-207 maturity, 366 tailoring, 209-220, 367 variability, 209-210 versus method, 367 Process view, 112-114 attributes, 41

flexibility or rigor, 215-216 maturity, 215-216 transitions, 247-253 Production stage, 74-76 Product release milestone, 132 Progress metric, 190-191, 338-342 Progress profile, 12, 226 Project control, 187-207 Project environment, 172-185 Project organizations, 155-166 evolution of, 165-166 line-of-business, 155-158 project, 158-165 Project performance, next-generation, 252 Project Review Authority, 157 Project size, 213, 218-220 Prototyping, 92-93 Prototyping environment, 172

Quality, 31, 48-50, 284-285, 291-293 Quality indicators, 188-190, 196-199 Quality inspections, 51-53

Release descriptions, 99-100 Release histories, 178-179 Release specifications, 96-98 Requirements-driven approach, 14-16 Requirements set, 86 Requirements workflow, 118-124 Return on investment, 25 Reuse, 38-39 Reverse engineering, 47 Rework, 42-43, 296

Rework and adaptability metric, 197-198 Rework ratio, 292

Rework stability, 293 Risk conventional software project, 14, 66 late resolution, 13-14, 225 modern process, 66 Risk management across project life cycle, 13-14, 228-229 addressing early, 63 early resolution, 227-229 iterative process, 67 waterfall model, 8-11 Round-trip engineering, 47, 64, 68, 119,

173-174, 232, 233 Royce, Winston, 6-11

Scale, 210-213, 218-220, 240-241 Schedules, 42,149-150,218 Software Acquisition Best Practices Initiative, 232-235 Software architecture, 110-115 Software architecture team, 161-162 Software assessment team, 163-165 Software change order database, 100-101 Software change orders, 175-178, 285,

353-354 Software development plan, 98-99 Software development team, 162-163 Software economics, 21-25 evolution of, 21-29 improving, 31-53 modern, 242-245 next-generation, 237-245 trends for improving, 32 Software Engineering Environment Authority, 157, 158

Software Engineering Institute, 215, 361-387 Software Engineering Process Authority,

157,158 Software management best practices, 232-235 state of the practice, 259-264 Software management principles, top 10, 231-232

Software management team, 160-161

Software project control panel, 202-207 Software project managers, 45—46 Software project success, 259-264 Software user manual, 104-105 Stability metric, 196-197, 343 cohesion or contention, 214 staffing and team dynamics metric,

195-196 teamwork, 229-230 Stakeholder environments, 184-185 Standish Group, 5, 261-262 Status assessments, 100, 133-134

Teams, 43-45

improving effectiveness, 43-46 team dynamics metric, 195-196 Test artifacts, 93-95 Tools, 168-172 Transition phase, 80-81 Transition team, 166

Type 0 change order, 178, 180 Type 1 change order, 178, 180 Type 2 change order, 179, 180 Type 3 change order, 179, 180 Type 4 change order, 179,180

Unified Modeling Language, 36, 84,109-115 Universal function points, 34-36 Use case view, 112-113

Vision documents, 103-104 Visual Basic, 34

Visual modeling, 36-37, 49, 50, 65

Waterfall model, 6-17

Work and progress metric, 190-191

Work breakdown structures, 96, 139-146,

268-269 Workflows, 117-124

Software Engineering/Software Project Management

Software Project Management

Walker Royce

Software Project Management presents a new management framework uniquely suited to the complexities of modern software development. Walker Royce's pragmatic perspective exposes the shortcomings of many well-accepted management priorities and equips software professionals with state-of-the-art knowledge derived from his twenty years of successful from-the-trenches project management experience.

This book provides a clear and provocative discussion of the economics, metrics, and management strategies needed to plan and execute a software project successfully. Royce discusses—with refreshing candor—some of the fads, follies, and excesses of the software industry, clearly differentiating proven techniques from obsolete methods. Paired with this insightful examination are compelling arguments for new management approaches that are sure to stimulate debate. The relative impacts of these new techniques are quantified through simple economic analyses, common sense, and anecdotal evidence. The resulting framework strikes a pragmatic balance between theory and practice that can be readily applied in today's challenging development environment. An extensive case study of a large-scale, million-line project—deployed successfully on schedule and under budget using these techniques—further illustrates their application.

Software Project Management provides the software industry with field-proven benchmarks for making tactical decisions and strategic choices that will enhance an organization's probability of success. This book includes:

• Top ten principles for modern software management

• Strategies for smoothly transitioning an organization to modern processes and technologies (such as Rational's Unified process)

• Methods for keeping software engineering teams motivated and effectively prioritized

• Insight into how technology, people, and economics impact project management

• Metrics and forecasting guidance for project costs, schedules, and quality control

Walker Royce is a Vice President and General Manager at Rational Software Corporation. During the past two decades at Rational and TRW, he has performed in roles ranging from coder, designer, integrator, cost estimator, and trainer to software architect, R&D manager, product manager, and project manager.

Find more information about the Object Technology Series at http://www.awl.com/cseng/otseries

O Text printed on recycled paper

AADDISON-WESLEY Pearson Education

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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