Software Project Management Second Edition

Bob Hughes and Mike Cotterell,

School of Information Management, University of Brighton

The McGraw-Hill Companies

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Printed in Great Britain at the University Press, Cambridge 12 3 4 5 CUP 3 2 10 9

6 Activity planning 107

6.1 Introduction 107

6.2 The objectives of activity planning 108

6.3 When to plan 109

6.4 Project schedules 109

6.5 Projects and activities 111

6.6 Sequencing and scheduling activities 115

6.7 Network planning models 116

6.8 Formulating a network model 117

6.9 Using dummy activities 121

6.10 Representing lagged activities 122

6.11 Adding the time dimension 122

6.12 The forward pass 124

6.13 The backward pass 125

6.14 Identifying the critical path 127

6.15 Activity float 128

6.16 Shortening the project duration 129

6.17 Identifying critical activities 129

6.18 Precedence networks 130

6.19 Conclusion 131

6.20 Further exercises 132

7 Risk management 133

7.1 Introduction 133

7.2 The nature of risk 133

7.3 Managing risk 135

7.4 Risk identification 137

7.5 Risk analysis 139

7.6 Reducing the risks 142

7.7 Evaluating risks to the schedule 143

7.8 Calculating the z values 147

7.9 Conclusions 150

7.10 Further exercises 150

8 Resource allocation 151

8.1 Introduction 151

8.2 The nature of resources 152

8.3 Identifying resource requirements 153

8.4 Scheduling resources 154

8.5 Creating critical paths 159

8.6 Counting the cost 161

8.7 Being specific 161

The road to hell is paved with works-in-progress.

Philip Roth

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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