Matrix Layering

Matrix layering can be defined as the creation of one matrix within a second matrix. For example, a company can have a total company matrix, and each division or department (i.e., project engineering) have its own internalized matrix. In the situation of a matrix within a matrix, all matrices are formal operations.

Matrix layering can also be a mix of formal and informal organizations. The for-

Figure 3-11. The design matrix. Source: Marc S. Caspe, "An Overview of Project Management and Project Management Services," Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Seminar Symposium on Project Management, 1979, pp. 8-9.
Figure 3-12. The construction matrix. Source: Marc S. Caspe, "An Overview of Project Management and Project Management Services," Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Seminar Symposium on Project Management, 1979, pp. 8-9.

mal matrix exists for work flow, but there can also exist an informal matrix for information flow. The are also authority matrices, leadership matrices, reporting matrices, and informal technical direction matrices. Figures 3-11 and 3-12 identify the design matrix and construction matrix that can exist wit] the total company matrix.

Another example of layering would be the multidimensional matrix, shown in Figure 3-13, where ea< slice represents either time, distance, or geographic area. For example, a New York bank utilizes a multinational matrix to control operations in foreign countries. In this case, each foreign country wou represent a different slice of the total matrix.

Figure 3-13. The multidimensional matrix.
Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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