Exhibit Tap Domestic Passenger Origin Destination Markets and Airline Service Stapleton international Airport for the months ended September

Force n tü¡>e of

certificated

Average daily

Cily uf orgin or

Air miles

airline

nonstop

destination {a)

from Denvtr

passe liters

departures !b}

I.

Los Angeles (c)

849

6.8

34

2.

New York <d)

1,630

6.2

19

3.

Chicago (c)

908

5.6

26

4.

Sa» Fruncísco (f)

957

5.6

29

5,

Washington. D C. <g}

1,476

4.9

12

6,

Dallas/Forth Worth

644

3.5

26

7.

Houston (h)

864

3.2

15

8.

Phoenix

589

31

19

9.

Seattle

1.019

2.6

14

10.

Minneapolis

m

2.3

16

Cities listed

43,8

210

All ÜltlCÍTi

56.2

241

Total

100.0

45 i

(a) Top LQ cilicj bastd on tolnl inbound and oiMbtHinil pii^sengers fan lur^u; aaaUkMCd uirlin«jO si SLiplcwn lottnulioiis] Airport in t(Ki sample for the 12 mtniilis ended September JO, 1^3,

(b) Official AirJincGutiifti. Inc. (online data April IW. Includc^ JoiDiiMic nighi* operated ait leasl foarday;. per wick by iTiajor/rulional airlines and c.icludcs the ¡rctwuy of foreign-flag ;md com mule r/rejiiona! airlines.

(c) Los iin^clci IniL'mjLLisnjI. Burbaiik-GleiiJ^le'Pjsadfnij, John Wayne County). Onlario Irtfcmalipnal. and Long Bcaeb Municipal Airports,

Cd> Johj) F. Kennedy International, LaGuanlia. ;ui() Newark International Airport*.

[t) Chitflfio-O H»rs Imi^rniiiiona] and Midway Airptin*.

CO San Francisco. Mctrrtptiliian Oaldand, and San Jose luiimjiional Airpon*.

{¿) Washington Dulles International. Washington Narooal, and Batcininrt'/Wjsli in ^mit Enteimtional Airports.

C i-l.i Houjicrti Intercontinental and Wisiiam p. \ lobby Airport*,

Sources; U S. Dt^liWH of Transporutiuii/Air Tranvpun A^MKiaiioii ol America. "Origin-Destination Survey of

Airline Passenger Traffic. Domestic." (hind quarter LV93, e*ccpl as nutud.

(a) Top LQ cilicj bastd on tolnl inbound and oiMbtHinil pii^sengers fan lur^u; aaaUkMCd uirlin«jO si SLiplcwn lottnulioiis] Airport in t(Ki sample for the 12 mtniilis ended September JO, 1^3,

(b) Official AirJincGutiifti. Inc. (online data April IW. Includc^ JoiDiiMic nighi* operated ait leasl foarday;. per wick by iTiajor/rulional airlines and c.icludcs the ¡rctwuy of foreign-flag ;md com mule r/rejiiona! airlines.

(c) Los iin^clci IniL'mjLLisnjI. Burbaiik-GleiiJ^le'Pjsadfnij, John Wayne County). Onlario Irtfcmalipnal. and Long Bcaeb Municipal Airports,

Cd> Johj) F. Kennedy International, LaGuanlia. ;ui() Newark International Airport*.

[t) Chitflfio-O H»rs Imi^rniiiiona] and Midway Airptin*.

CO San Francisco. Mctrrtptiliian Oaldand, and San Jose luiimjiional Airpon*.

{¿) Washington Dulles International. Washington Narooal, and Batcininrt'/Wjsli in ^mit Enteimtional Airports.

C i-l.i Houjicrti Intercontinental and Wisiiam p. \ lobby Airport*,

Sources; U S. Dt^liWH of Transporutiuii/Air Tranvpun A^MKiaiioii ol America. "Origin-Destination Survey of

Airline Passenger Traffic. Domestic." (hind quarter LV93, e*ccpl as nutud.

ports combined. Unfortunately, a state law took effect prohibiting political entities from annexing land without the consent of its residents. The land was in Adams County. Before the vote was taken, Adams County and Denver negotiated an agreement limiting noise and requiring the creation of a buffer zone to protect surrounding residents. The agreement also included continuous noise monitoring, as well as limits on such businesses as airport hotels that could be in direct competition with existing services provided in Adams County. The final part of the agreement limited DIA to such businesses as airline maintenance, cargo, small package delivery, and other such airport-related activities.

With those agreements in place, Denver annexed 45 square miles and purchased an additional 8 square miles for noise buffer zones. Denver rezoned the buffer area to prohibit residential development within a 65 LDN (Level Day/Night) noise level. LDN is a weighted noise measurement intended to determine perceived noise in both day and night conditions. Adams County enacted even stiffer zoning regulations calling for no residential development with an LDN noise level of 60.

Exhibit 11-5. Enplaned Passengers by Airline 1992-1993, Stapleton International Airport

Enplaned passengers 1992

United 6,887,936

United Express(1) 470,841

7,358,777

1993

7,793,246 578,619 8,371,865

Continental Continental Express

5,162,812 514,293 5,677,105

4,870,861 532,046 5,402,907

American Airlines America West Airlines Delta Air Lines MarkAir

Northwest Airlines Trans World Airlines US Air Other

Total

599,705 176,963 643,644 2,739 317,507 203,096 201,949 256,226 2,401,829 15,437,711

563,119 156,032 634,341 93,648 320,527 182,502 197,095 398,436 2,545,700 16,320,472

(1) Includes Mesa Airlines, Air Wisconsin, Great Lakes Aviation and Westair Airlines. (Source: Department of Aviation managment records.)

Most of the airport land embodied two ranches. About 550 people were relocated. The site had overhead power lines and gas wells, which were relocated or abandoned. The site lacked infrastructure development and there were no facilities for providing water, power, sewage disposal, or other such services.

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