Planning Step Five Assign And Level Resources

The goal of resource leveling is to optimize the use of people and equipment assigned to the project. It begins with the assumption that, when possible, it is most productive to have consistent, continuous use of the fewest resources possible. In other words, it seeks to avoid repeatedly adding and removing resources, particularly people, time and again, throughout the project. Resource leveling is the last step in creating a realistic schedule. It confronts the reality of limited people and...

Project Management

The Portable MBA, Fourth Edition, Robert Bruner, Mark Eaker, R. Edward Freeman, Robert Spekman, Elizabeth Teisberg, and S. Venkataraman The Portable MBA Desk Reference, Second Edition, Nitin Nohria The Portable MBA in Economics, Philip K. Y. Young The Portable MBA in Entrepreneurship, Second Edition, William D. Bygrave The Portable MBA in Entrepreneurship Case Studies, William D. Bygrave The Portable MBA in Finance and Accounting, Third Edition, John Leslie Livingstone and Theodore Grossman The...

Project Management As A Strategic Strength

What is the single largest factor driving the increased use of project management methods The ever-present, ever-increasing pace of change present in our world today. Whether you work in health care, banking, professional services, manufacturing, aerospace, computer hardware and software, telecommunications, or entertainment, you feel the changes all around you. You can be employed by a government agency, nonprofit firm, small business, or Fortune 500 corporation, and you will experience the...

Critical Path

When the initial schedule has been calculated, the project schedule begins to take shape. One of the key features of the initial schedule is the critical path. The term critical path is one of the most widely used and most widely misunderstood of all project management terms. However, the concept is simple The critical path is defined as all of the tasks with zero or negative float. When outlined on a network diagram, the critical path is the longest path through the network. (The critical path...

Deming Crosby Feigenbaum and Juran Compared

Quality is continuous improvement through reduced variation. 1. The central problem in lack of quality is the failure of management to understand variation. (Everything varies. Statistics help us to predict how much variation there will be.) 2. It is management's responsibility to know whether the problems are in the system or in the behavior of the people. 3. Teamwork should be based on knowledge, design, redesign. Constant improvement is management's responsibility. Most causes of low quality...