Schedule Categories

Three types of integrated schedules will be used:

1. Gantt type of schedules a. Activity. Activity schedules derive from the WBS of the project "decomposed" to at least the fourth level. Tasks are outlined activities in a "roll up" hierarchy to a summary task and each activity is defined in a generic WBS data dictionary that defines the activity and its inputs and outputs.

b. Lead time. Lead-time scheduling is based on estimating lead times and establishing milestones that anticipate the "triggering" of actions downstream. For instance, if the lead time for beginning activity A is 5 weeks because of necessary supporting material purchase, the linkage of activity A to purchasing as a predecessor establishes the lead time for activity A.

c. Milestone. A milestone is an intermediate or final point in the schedule where significant deliverables are due or when a phase or stage is to be completed. Milestones are planned for each activity to allow earned value determinations, e.g., 50% complete is aligned with half the work of the activity and a specific deliverable is associated with 50% complete in the baseline schedule. This allows earned value to be based on work progress that is specifically aligned with outputs.

d. IMP/IMS. The IMP (integrated master plan) includes all key costs, schedule, and quality information to serve as the project plan. The IMP includes project goals and objectives, customer requirements, scope of work, schedule and budget, risk assessment, a description of the approach to the work and deliverables, and the project team.

e. The IMS (integrated master schedule) is the highest summary level schedule for a project, depicting the overall phasing and all major interfaces, contractual milestones, and key elements. The interfaces are shown as milestone reviews in the project schedule.

2. Network logic diagrams. The network logic diagram is an arrow diagram showing the basic independencies in the project.

Having identified the basic tasks of this summary task, one builds a network diagram and time based network of this summary task, which is later integrated with other summary task diagrams to create the whole project network, as shown in Fig. 5.1.

3. Line of balance. Line of balance is a method of keeping track on key milestones on the way to satisfy multiple deliverables. The "line" in the line of balance is actually the goal for meeting intermediate milestones, say, full

Project paths:

A, C, F, G, H = 6 + 50 + 35 + 3 + 3 = 96 (critical path)

Time-Based Network Diagram

Project paths:

A, C, F, G, H = 6 + 50 + 35 + 3 + 3 = 96 (critical path)

Time-Based Network Diagram

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