Understanding Decision Structures

Decision structures control whether other statements execute, according to the results of conditional statements. In the function strNewTask, for instance, there was an If.. .Then.. .Else decision structure that determined what to set for the function's return value, based on the results of a test.

There are four different decision structures, each suitable for different situations, but they are all very similar:

If...Then. The simplest of all decision structures, the If.. .Then statement takes just one action if just one condition is met. If the condition is not met, the statement does nothing:

If ActiveProject.Tasks(1).PercentComplete = 100 Then MsgBox "Task complete!"

If the first task's PercentComplete property is not 100, the line is skipped.

If the first task's PercentComplete property is not 100, the line is skipped.

If...Then...Else. A more common form of decision structure is the one used in the function strNewTask, If.. .Then.. .Else. Unlike the If.. .Then statement, this structure performs a test to determine not whether it should take action, but which action it should take. Something will always happen because meeting the condition results in one action, and anything else results in the second:

If ActiveProject.Tasks(1).PercentComplete = 100 Then MsgBox "The task is complete!"

Else

MsgBox "The task is not finished." End If

In this situation, if the task's PercentComplete property is 100, the dialog box appears just as it does for the If.. .Then statement. The difference here is that anything less than 100 also displays a dialog box. If...Then...ElseIf. A variation on the If.. .Then.. .Else type is the If.. .Then.. .ElseIf block. In this variation, there can be any number of ElseIf statements, each of which performs a further refinement of the test defined in the original If.. .Then statement. For example:

If ActiveProject.Tasks(1).PercentComplete = 100 Then

MsgBox "The task is complete!" ElseIf ActiveProject.Tasks(1).PercentComplete >= 50 Then

MsgBox "The task is more than half finished." ElseIf ActiveProject.Tasks(1).PercentComplete > 0 Then

MsgBox "The task has started, but is less than 50% complete."

3"

Else

MsgBox "The task has not started!" End If

Select Case. This is another way to test for a large number of conditions, but in a more readable way than an If.. .Then.. .Elself block.

Select Case ActiveProject.Tasks(1).PercentComplete Case Is = 100

MsgBox "The task is complete!" Case Is >= 50

MsgBox "The task is more than half finished." Case Is > 0

MsgBox "The task has started, but is less than 50% complete." Case Is = 0

MsgBox "The task has not started!" End Select

Note The Is keyword used here is only required because these Case statements are also comparisons, which means they have to be compared with something. Typically, the Select Case statement contains a reference to a variable, and each Case statement represents a different possible value.

As you can see, using the Select Case structure makes it much easier to find the different conditions for displaying a dialog box. In fact, the statement

is even more explicit than is strictly necessary because we've already eliminated every other possible value for the PercentComplete property. In this instance, a simple

Case Else would have been sufficient, and is probably just as readable.

Tip The more explicit, the better

The value in using an explicit construction instead of the Case Else statement can be shown by simply asking this question: What if you didn't know that the range of possible values for the PercentComplete property was 0-100?

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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