Inside Out

Relieve the leveling hair-trigger

The leveling indicator often suggests that the resource be leveled on a Day By Day basis because Microsoft Project has found that this resource is overallocated by at least one minute over the resource availability for a day.

You might find that level of detail too fine for your purposes. It might be more effective to level resources on a Week By Week basis or a Month By Month basis. Although the overal-location is still detected when you're overallocated by just one minute, looking at the entire week or the entire month instead of just one day provides more "wiggle room" for overallocations to take care of themselves.

To change the leveling trigger, click Tools, Level Resources. In the Look For Overallocations On A Basis box, click Week By Week or Month By Month. Click OK.

You can also see the details about which assignments are causing resource overallocations (or underallocations) by using the Resource Usage view, as follows:

1 Click View, Resource Usage (see Figure 11-18).

Figure 11-18. The Resource Usage view shows how resources are allocated for each time period, as well as the specific assignments that contribute to that allocation.

Figure 11-18. The Resource Usage view shows how resources are allocated for each time period, as well as the specific assignments that contribute to that allocation.

Any resource whose name appears in red or with a leveling indicator is overallocated.

2 Review the timesheet portion of the view to see where the overallocation occurs. You might need to scroll to move to a different time period.

3 On the Standard toolbar, click the Zoom Out button to see the Resource Usage view for a longer period of time. Click the Zoom In button to see details about a shorter period of time.

4 Review the sheet portion of the view to see the assignments for each resource.

5 You can add the Overallocation field to the timesheet portion of the view, which you can use to learn how many hours or days, for example, a resource is overallocated. To do this, click Format, Details, Overallocation (see Figure 11-19).

0 Resource Name

Work

Det 'I

Mar '04

15

22 29

7 14

4

<î> S Dauid Barber

320 hrs

Work Qveralloc.

32h

40hi

64hj i

Review functional specifications

8 firs

Sh

Qveralloc.

Mentit/ modula if tiered design parameters

8 firs

Work

Sh

Qveralloc.

Assign development staff

8 firs

Work

nil

Qveralloc.

Develop code

15& firs

Work

nil

40h 40h

40h

Qveralloc.

Developer testing (primary debugging)

140 firs

Work

8h 40h

40h

06hj

Qveralloc.

Figure 11-19. Add the Overallocation field to the Resource Usage view to see the number of hours (or other time period) by which each resource is overallocated.

6 To see underallocations or the amount of time that a resource is available for more assignments, add the Remaining Availability field to the timesheet portion of the view. Click Format, Details, Remaining Availability.

Tip Apply the Work table to the Resource Usage view

If you apply the Work table to the Resource Usage view, you can see work details and tracking information for each resource and assignment—including baseline work, the variance between the baseline and scheduled work, any actual work reported, remaining work, and percent complete.

Use the Resource Allocation view to see the Resource Usage view in combination with the er

Leveling Gantt. This view helps you see which resources are overallocated in conjunction pa with the tasks that are causing the overallocation. Click View, More Views. In the More Views °

dialog box, click Resource Allocation and then click Apply (see Figure 11-20).

Figure 11-20. With the Resource Allocation view, you can see task information in the lower pane for any assignment you click in the Resource Usage view in the upper pane.

With the Summary table applied to a resource view, you can see the Peak field, which can quickly tell you whether resources are allocated to their maximum availability (100 percent), overallocated (more than 100 percent), or underallocated (less than 100 percent). Click View, Table, Summary (see Figure 11-21).

Resource Name

Group

Max. Units

Peak

Std. Rate

Ovt. Rate

Cost

Wort

1

Eva Corets

100%

100%

160.00/hr

10.00/hr

13,360.00

56 hrs

2

Clair Hector

100%

200%

$55.00/hr

$0.00/hr

$5,200.00

96 hrs

3

Ido Ben-Sachar

100%

200%

$45.00/hr

$0.00/hr

$0,020.00

196 hrs

4

Dauid Barber

100%

200%

$60.00/hr

$0.00/hr

$19,200.00

320 hrs

5

Testers

100%

200%

$30.00/hr

$0.00/hr

$0,400.00

260 hrs

6

Trainers

100%

300%

$35.00/hr

$0.00/hr

$0,960.00

256 hrs

7

Technical communicators

100%

200%

$36.00/hr

$0.00/hr

$12,760.00

336 hrs

8

Deployment team

100%

100%

140.00/hr

10.00/hr

$3,840.00

96 hrs

Figure 11-21. By reviewing the Peak field for resources, you can quickly see how many resources are allocated and whether they're available to take on more assignments.

The following filters can help you focus on any potential problems with overallocated resources:

• Overallocated Resources (see Figure 11-22)

• Work Overbudget

• Resources/Assignments With Overtime

• Slipping Assignments

Figure 11-22. Apply the Overallocated Resources filter to a resource view to quickly see a list of resources who have more work assigned than time available for that work.

Figure 11-22. Apply the Overallocated Resources filter to a resource view to quickly see a list of resources who have more work assigned than time available for that work.

With a resource view displayed, apply a filter by clicking the Filter tool on the Formatting toolbar. In the Filter list, click the name of the filter you want.

You can also run the following reports that provide information about resource usage:

• Overallocated Resources (see Figure 11-23)

• Resource Usage

Figure 11-23. Run the Overallocated Resources report to get detailed information about resources who have too much work assigned.

To run an assignments or workload report, click View, Reports. Double-click Assignments or Workload and then double-click the report you want.

Balancing the Resource Workload 3

Suppose that you reviewed information about assignments and workload throughout your g-

project plan and found that some resources are overallocated and others are underallocated. o

Or perhaps your company had a reduction in force, and your project staffing was reduced by 15 percent.

If you need to take corrective actions in your project plan to balance the resource workload, you can:

• Adjust resource availability.

• Adjust assignments, for example, add resources, replace resources, delay a task or assignment, or specify overtime.

• Split tasks to balance the workload.

• Use the Microsoft Project leveling feature to balance the workload.

• Adjust scope (this will probably require stakeholder approval).

For more information about using any of these strategies to better allocate your resources, see "Balancing Resource Workloads" on page 271.

Note When you adjust your project plan to achieve the resource allocation levels you need, be sure to check the scheduled finish date, costs, and scope. You need to know how your changes affect other areas of the project plan.

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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