P

Packer Telecom, 171-172 Paperwork, reduction of, 82 Parts scheduling, 23 Partnerships, 162-163 Past performance, analysis of, 18, 21 Pepsi, 34

Perceived failure, 155 Performance improvement strategy, 21, 22

PERT/CPM tools, 32 Physical resources, 36-37 Planning failure, 153-155 PMBOK, see Project management body of knowledge PMI, see Project Management Institute PMIS (project management information system), 114 PMMM, see Project management maturity model PMPs, see Project management professionals PO, see Project office Policies and procedures, 16 Political environment, 27 Portfolios, project, 131-134 Portfolio classification matrix, 128-131 Printers, color, 82 Prioritization, 126 failure in, 40 of risks, 165-166 Procedural documentation, 114-119 benefits of, 114-115, 116-117 categorizing, 118-119

challenges to development of, 115 management support for,

115-116 as sign of maturity, 119 task force concept for development of, 117-118 uniformity in, 116-117 Process improvement benchmarking, 101

Procter & Gamble, 34, 145 Procurement staff, resistance to change by, 159, 160 Product stakeholders, 5 Profitability, 2

Project control forms, 116-118 Project definition process, 16-17, 18 Project management: baselines for, 16-17 benefits of, 2-4

common complaints concerning,

28-29 as core competencies, 1 environment for, 26 impact of economic conditions on,

11-14 informal, 82

misconceptions about, 1-3 need for strategic planning in, 1-9 stakeholders in, 4-5 and strategic business units, 12 strategic planning for, see Strategic planning synergies in, 21-23 Project management body of knowledge (PMBOK), 50-51 Project management certification training courses, 48 Project management curriculum, 68,

72, 123-125 Project management information system (PMIS), 114 Project Management Institute (PMI), 50, 98

Project management maturity model (PMMM), 41-46 levels of, 42-43. See also specific levels overlapping of levels in, 43-45 risks in, 45-46

Project management professionals

(PMPs), 49, 67 Project managers, 31

and partnerships with line managers,

162-163 reporting level for, 137-138 Project office (PO), 98-100, 109 Project sponsors, see

Sponsors/sponsorship

Qualitative benchmarking, 99 Qualitative factors:

in achieving excellence, 14 in strategic planning, 29-30 Quality:

and project management, 3 Quantitative benchmarking, 99 Quantitative factors in achieving excellence, 14 Quantum Telecom, 182-183

R&D, see Research and development Recession of 1989-1993, 12 Research and development (R&D), 21, 69

and resistance to change by R&D

staff, 159, 160 and sustainable competitive advantage, 143-144 Resistance to change, 17-18, 49, 71, 103. See also Change management Resources, identification of, 18, 19, 34-38

intangible resources, 37-38 in project portfolios, 132-134 tangible resources, 34-35 Resource constraint analysis, 23 Resource models, 22 Restructuring, see Organizational restructuring Return on investment, with training, 82-84

Risks, of PMMM levels, 45-46

Risk analysis:

customer involvement in, 24 effect of 1989-1993 recession on, 12 supplier involvement in, 23 Risk identification, 23 Risk management, 79, 80, 151-152, 163-170 as component of failure, 155-156 and cost of project manager, 126 and intensity of controls vs. risks, 163-165

and interdependencies between risks, 166-168 methodology for, 22-24 prioritization of risks for, 165-166 response mechanism selection in,

168-170 and sustainable competitive advantage, 143-144 Risk-reward matrix, 169

Sales staff, resistance to change by, 158-160

SBUs, see Strategic business units Scope changes, 2, 29-30, 126 Scope change management, 22, 23 Selection process, project, 18-21, 24 portfolio classification matrix,

128-131 and project portfolios, 131-134 Senior management:

acceptance of project management by, 70

as driving force for project management, 69 involvement of, in project management, 41 involvement of, in strategic planning, 25-26 and multiple project management, 126

project manager support from, 28-33

relationship with, 81-82 responsibilities of, 35-36 Shared accountability, 85, 86, 126 Shareholder value, 3-4

Singular methodology (level 3 of PMMM), 42-45, 77-96 assessment instrument for, 87-96 characteristics of, 77-78 and common processes, 86 corporate culture for support of, 81, 86

and growth in successes, 84-85 indication of, 84

and informal project management, 82

integration of processes for, 78-81 key actions required for, 85-86 management support of, 81-82 risks associated with, 45, 46 roadblocks to, 85 time period for completion of, 86 and training/education, 82-84 Social groups, and resistance to change, 161 Social responsibility, 38 Sociocultural environment, 27 Software enhancements, 102 Software training, 33 Speed to market gap, 6 Sponsors/sponsorship, 31-32 and canceled projects, 127 effect of 1989-1993 recession on, 12 relationship with, 81 Stakeholders in project management,

4-5, 24, 25 Standard practices, 25, 27 Strategic business units (SBUs), 12, 13, 37

Strategic focus, 12, 146 Strategic planning, 13

and communication of overall goals, 17-18

critical success factors for, 28-33 and customer involvement, 24 definition of, 15

executive involvement in, 25-26 failure of, 38-40 formulation process in, 15-16 and gap analysis, 5-8 general environment for, 26-28 and identification of resources, 34-38

implementation phase of, 16

integrated strategies, 21-24 need for, in project management, 1-9

organizational factors in, 30-32 for project management, 16 qualitative factors in, 29-30 quantitative factors in, 32-33 relationship to project management, 12, 13

special problems with, 151-170 and stakeholders, 25 thinking process for, 18-21 Strategic timing, 26 Strengths and weaknesses, determination of, 18-21, 34 Success(es), 67, 152-153 critical success factors, 28-33 and decision-making approach, 21 definitions of, 29, 152-153 documentation of, 110 growth in, 84-85 and possibility of failure, 38 primary, 152-153 redefining, 151 secondary, 152-153 and standard methodology, 16 Supplier involvement, 23 Sustainable competitive advantage, 143-149 and competitive focus, 146 continuous improvement required for, 147-148 and core values/purpose, 145-146 and project management competitiveness, 148-149 and strategic focus, 146 strategic thrusts for, 144-147 and synergy, 147 Synergies, 21-24, 147

Tangible resources, 34-37 Task force concept (form development), 117-118 Team building, 12

Technical baseline (project definition process), 16-17 Technical risk analysis, 24

Technological environment, 27 Thinking process, for strategic planning, 18-21 3M, 145 Time gap, 6-8 Timing, strategic, 26 Total quality management (TQM), 22,

23, 48, 78-80 Training and education, 157-158 to avoid failure, 38 effect of 1989-1993 recession on, 12

for level 1, 48 for level 3, 78, 82-84 project management curriculum, 68, 72

software, 33 Trophy Project, 209-211

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