Banding

If we study Figure 13.1 we note that it is very easy to find a particular activity on the network. For example, if we wanted to know how long it would take to excavate the foundations of exchanger B, we would look down the column excavate until we found the line exchanger b, and the intersection of this column and line shows the required excavation activity. This simple identification process was made possible because Figure 13.1 was drawn using very crude subdivisions or bands to separate the various operations.

For certain types of work this splitting of the network into sections can be of immense assistance in finding required activities. By listing the various types of equipment or materials vertically on the drawing paper and writing the operations to be performed horizontally, one produces a grid of activities which almost defines the activity. In some instances the line of operations may be replaced by a line of departments involved. For example, the electrical department involvement in the design of a piece of equipment can be found by reading across the equipment line until one comes to the electrical department column.

The principle is shown clearly in Figure 13.5, and it can be seen that the idea can be applied to numerous types of networks. A few examples of banding networks are given below, but these are for guidance only since the actual selection of bands depends on the type of work to be performed and the degree of similarity of operation between the different equipment items.

Vertical listing

(Horizontal line)

Equipment

Equipment

Material

Design stages

Construction stages

Decision stages

Approvals

Operations

Operations

Horizontal listing

(Vertical column)

Operations

Departments

Operations

Departments

Subcontracts

Departments

Authorities (clients)

Department responsibilities

Broad time periods

It may, of course, be advantageous to reverse the vertical and horizontal bands; when considering, for example, the fifth item on the list, the subcontracts could be listed vertically and the construction stages horizontally. This would most likely be the case when the subcontractors perform similar operations since the actual work stages would then follow logically across the

Design and drawing

Procurement

Manufacture

Assemply and desp. to site

Drums

Headers

Boiler tubes

Base frame

Gauges

Fans & motor

Ducts

Site insulate

Requ'n

Manuf. plate

Tender o a^o

Roll

Fabric

Design o

Design

Tender Dellv

Delivery

Erect

Fabric base

Erect towers

Tender

O Inspect

Delivery to site

Tender

Delivery to site

O Design Requ'n

Tender

Requ'n Drgs Plate

Manufacture

Deliver o

Fabric o^o

Delivery to site

Deliver o

Erect

Figure 13.5 Simplified boiler network page in the form of normally timed activities. It may indeed be beneficial to draw a small trial network of a few (say, 20-30) activities to establish the best banding configuration.

It can be seen that banding can be combined with the coordinate method of numbering by simply allocating a group of letters of the horizontal coordinates to a particular band.

Banding is particularly beneficial on master networks which cover, by definition, a number of distinct operations or areas, such as design, manufacture, construction and commissioning. Figure 13.5 is an example of such a network.

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Project Management Made Easy

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