What Makes a Project Manager

Well, then, given the definition of what' s a project, not everyone who supervises work is a project manager (PM); most work is ongoing, common, and ad hoc (not specifically planned or controlled). So what traits define a PM? The role of a PM can be described from the definition of project itself: the person who is responsible for managing projects, making sure that they are planned, executed to the plan, and controlled. But the skills needed by a PM aren ' t as clear-cut. A project manager typically has the following characteristics:

Effectively balance skills and project forecasting. They must know how to skillfully apply knowledge, tools, and techniques to project activities in order to meet the project's objectives and satisfy its requirements.

Know how to be both firm and flexible. A great PM wears many hats: information distributor, information gatherer, organizer, communicator, director, cheerleader, regulator, and more.

Be able to identify and recruit project team members. Project managers might be technical experts, but this isn't required. In fact, the team that's performing the project should include those with technical expertise in order to make the project viable and sound.

Know how to communicate effectively by tailoring information for different people at every stage of the project. Project managers are expected to have knowledge of procurement, contract practices, general management practices, marketing, human resource management, financial management, political savvy (and how to employ it when needed), and—most importantly—fantastic communications skills.

This book is about project management with specific regard to IT projects. We'll utilize well-known and well-documented project management ideologies and techniques, always with a slant toward IT projects.

With these definitions set out, it's time to start breaking down projects and project management into their components, starting at the beginning: analysis of what you'll need.

With these definitions set out, it's time to start breaking down projects and project management into their components, starting at the beginning: analysis of what you'll need.

The Case of the Conflicting Hours

The Case of the Conflicting Hours

You're a project manager for Amalgamated Shoelaces Inc., a company with 14,000 employees and 10 different sites throughout North America. Amalgamated wants to set up an intranet portal solution so that users from any site can use a browser to connect to the portal, key in their timecards for the day, submit leave slips, make changes to their 401(k), read employee notices, and perform other activities that used to be paper-based.

You have formulated the project concept document, and now you are formulating the charter. You've been given an estimate by not one, but two different contractors that the work will require 1,200 hours. The IT development team submitted a document that stipulates that they don©t feel they need outside consulting help. They also wrote that they feel the work will take 300 hours.

Clearly there' s a disconnect here. Before you can go forward with the project charter, you need to more thoroughly dig into the nature of what it' s going to take to get the work done, then make a best-guess estimate as to what the hours will be. You ' re inclined to use one of the contractors, as the company has used them before and they do wonderful work; you need to find out why the IT team thinks they don' t need to outsource this project.

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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