Summary

In this chapter, I talked about your finalized project plan preparations. We began with a discussion of iteration: the concept of repetitively going back to a process, task, or phase in order to revisit and refine its outcomes.

Next, we discussed the work breakdown structure (WBS) and its associated standards. We start with a customer ' s asked-for deliverables, break the deliverables down into requirements, then break the requirements into the tasks, activities, and phases required to build the deliverable. This process is called decomposition.

The WBS must go through a formal sign-off segment where the project sponsor will examine the WBS and approve it. This sign-off step also includes presenting the WBS to the stakeholders so they can review it and make sure it meets the customer ' s initial deliverables needs.

A vendor' s statement of work (SOW) will find its way into the WBS, because the work listed there must mesh with the rest of the project work. Include a copy of the SOW with the project documentation.

We talked about milestones and how important they are for gauging how the project is going, both in terms of budget and time. We mentioned exit and entry criteria for various project phases or milestones in the project.

Finally, we talked about the final project plan and the components that will go into it: the table of contents (TOC), overview, sponsor(s), team members, requirements, scheduled tasks, expected resources, environmental issues, business requirements, implementation plans, support plans, and training plans.

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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