Standard Project Documentation

There are some highly important documents that will be fleshed out as a result of going through the various stages of a project. These documents should find their way into a binder called the project book. Here are some of the documents that I ' l l be talking about in later chapters that pertain to the various phases of the project process: Project concept document In this document, you basically stipulate back in writing what you heard the customer say. You' re conceptualizing the project as you see it from a project manager' s standpoint, and you include high-level information regarding the requirements, the constraints that you see, the basic elements of the project, and the essential ingredients. Don' t get incredibly specific here—that ' s for later. This document is discussed in Chapter 2.

Project requirements document Here you outline what you have gathered as the requirements for the document: the project' s deliverables must do this, must look like this, must be sure that this is included This document is covered in Chapters 2 and 6. Project charter The project charter is the document that acknowledges that the project exists, commits organizational resources to it, appoints the project manager, and gives an overview of the project. It might also include an initial resource identification and budget. This document is also covered in Chapter 2.

Project scope document This is the Moby-Dick of the project book. Here you detail, ad infinitum, the elements and ingredients of the project: resources, project members, project sponsor, etc. This document is constructed throughout Chapters 3, 4, and 5. Project plan This one details in writing how you' re going to go about accomplishing the project. You outline specific phases and steps, milestones, the sequencing of the steps, and so forth. This document is covered in Chapters 7 and 8.

Closing document With your closing document, you ' re simply providing a sign-off sheet whereby sponsors and customers can commit that what you' ve delivered is what they requested. If there are testing efforts that need to happen, as in the case of new software that you ' re creating, you include a document that shows the testing results and sign-off by the users that the testing is satisfactory. This document is described in Chapter 13.

Note In PMI, the first four are separate documents; in PACE they can be integrated into one.

Later in the book, I ' l l describe more documents that are only needed under certain circumstances. Such optional or ancillary documents can include a vendor' s statement of work (SOW) and privacy statements.

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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