Project Management Documents

Projects are full of plans, reports, and other documents. Having a clear understanding of each of the document types and why they may, or may not, be needed in a project can help you answer exam questions correctly. What follows is every document type and its Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) reference.

Activity cost estimate supporting detail This is the collection of documents that detail how the project's cost estimate was created. The supporting detail should include the following (for more information, see the PMBOK, Section 7.1.3.2):

• The scope of the work that the estimate is based on

• The basis for the estimate

• Documentation of the assumptions used in the estimate creation

• Documentation of the constraints used in the estimate creation

• The range of possible estimates, such as the +/- percentage of dollar amount

Activity duration estimate An estimate of the likely time it will take to complete the project, a phase, or individual activities within the project. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 6.4.3.1.

Activity list The collection of schedule activities is called the activity list. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 6.1.3.1.

Analogous estimate An estimate based on a previous similar project to predict the current project's time or cost expectations. For more information, see the PMBOK, Sections 6.4.2.2 and 7.1.2.1.

Arrow diagramming method A network diagram where the arrows represent the activities in the project and the diagram's nodes show the dependencies of the activities. This network diagramming approach only uses the finish-to-start relationship between activities. Should two activities need to happen in tandem, a "dummy activity" is added to the network diagram and is illustrated by a dashed line. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 6.2.2.2.

Bar charts A histogram that typically depicts the project activities and their associated start and end dates. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 6.5.3.1

Bill of materials (BOM) Defines the materials and products needed to create the items defined in the corresponding work breakdown structure (WBS). The BOM is arranged in sync with the hierarchy of the deliverables in the WBS. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 5.3.3.2.

Business case A business case is often needed for the project charter to justify the project's existence. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 4.1.

Cause-and-effect diagrams Also known as Ishikawa diagrams and fishbone diagrams. These illustrate how potential problems within a project may contribute to failure or errors within the project. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 8.3.2.1.

Change requests A documented request to change the project's scope is managed through the project's integrated change control process. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 4.4.3.2.

Claim A documented disagreement between the buyer and the seller. Claims are often settled through negotiations, mediation, or in the courts, depending on the terms of the contract. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.5.2.6.

Communications management plan This subsidiary plan defines who needs what information, when the information is needed, the frequency of the communication, and the accepted modalities for the communication needs. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 10.1.3.1.

Contract A legal relationship between the buyer and the seller that describes the work to be completed, the fee for performing the work, a schedule for completing the work, and acceptance criteria to deem the contract complete. If a project is being completed by one organization for another organization, there is typically a contractual relationship between the seller and the customer. Contracts may be inputs for the project charter. For more information, see the PMBOK, Sections 4.1.1 and 12.4.3.2.

Contract management plan A plan that is used for significant purchases. This plan directs the acquisition and adherence of both the buyer and the seller to the terms of the contract. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.4.3.3.

Contract statement of work This document defines the product and services that are being procured to satisfy portions of the project scope statement. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.1.3.2.

Control charts This quality-control tool illustrates the stability of a process and allows the project management team to determine if the process may have trends and predictability. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 8.3.2.2.

Cost baseline A time-phased budget that tracks the planned project expenses against the predicted project expenses. This document is used to measure, monitor, and control project costs in conjunction with the cost management plan. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 7.2.3.1.

Cost management plan A project management subsidiary plan that defines the structure for estimating, budgeting, and controlling project costs. For more information, see the introduction to Chapter 7 in the PMBOK and Section 7.1.3.4.

Cost plus fee or cost plus percentage of costs A contract in which the buyer pays the seller a fee for the contract work or deliverable plus an additional fee based on the percentage of the total costs for the goods or service provided. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.1.2.3.

Cost plus fixed fee A contract in which the buyer pays the seller the costs of the materials and/or labor to complete the contract work or deliverable plus a predetermined fee. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.1.2.3.

Cost plus incentive fee A contract in which the buyer pays the seller the costs of the materials and labor plus an incentive bonus for reaching objectives set by the buyer. Incentives are typically based on reaching schedule objectives. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.1.2.3.

Decision tree A diagram that identifies and evaluates each available outcome of a decision and the decision's implication, consideration of each choice, and the value of each decision. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 11.4.2.2.

Defect repair requests Requests to repair defects within the project deliverables. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 4.4.

Fishbone diagrams Also known as cause-and-effect diagrams and Ishikawa diagrams. These illustrate how potential problems within a project may contribute to failure or errors within the project. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 8.3.2.1.

Fixed-price or lump-sum contract A contract that defines the total price for the work or product the organization agrees to purchase. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.1.2.3.

Flowchart A flowchart is a visual representation of a process through a system. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 8.3.2.3.

Formal acceptance documentation A document that formally records that the project customer and/or sponsor has accepted the project deliverables. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 4.7.3.4.

Histogram A bar chart that shows the distribution of values. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 8.3.2.4.

Historical information Past project documentation and lessons-learned documents are often used as inputs and references for current projects. Current project documentation and lessons-learned documentation become historical information for future projects within an organization. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 4.7.3.4.

Independent estimate Also known as a third-party estimate and should-cost estimate, this document serves as a mean for estimates provided by potential vendors to complete the work the contract calls for. An independent estimate is often created by a third party for the performing organization for a fee. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.4.2.2.

Influence diagram A chart that shows the relationships between and among causal factors, events, situations, and other project conditions. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 11.2.2.5.

Invitation for bid A document inviting a prospective vendor to bid on the contents of the contract statement of work. This is a price-based decision model. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.2.3.1.

Ishikawa diagrams Also known as cause-and-effect diagrams and fishbone diagrams. These illustrate how potential problems within a project may contribute to failure or errors within the project. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 8.3.2.1.

Issue log A document or database that records the issue, the issue owner(s), and a date by which the issued must be resolved. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 9.4.2.4.

Lessons-learned documentation The results of quality control and other types of lessons learned are documented and become part of organizational process assets. Lessons-learned documentation is created throughout the project's life cycle. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 8.3.3.8.

Milestone chart A chart that depicts the promised milestone completion and the actual milestone completion dates. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 6.5.3.1.

Milestone list The documented collection of the project milestones and their attributes, deadlines, and requirements. The milestone list is part of the overall project management plan. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 6.1.3.3.

Nondisclosure agreement A procurement document that requires the vendor to not disclose information about the contract to anyone within or without of the performing organization. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 12.2.2.1.

Organizational breakdown structure There can be two versions of this document. First, there's the decomposition of the project's hierarchy of organizations, departments, and disciplines related to the work packages in the WBS. This document helps the project management team determine which disciplines or departments are responsible for which work packages as identified in the WBS. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 5.3.3.2. Second, this could depict the organization's departments, teams, functional departments, and business units. For more information, see the PMBOK, Section 9.1.2.1.

Parametric estimate An estimate based on a parameter, such as a cost per metric ton or number of hours to complete a repetitive activity. For more information, see the PMBOK, Sections 6.4.2.3 and 7.1.2.4.

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment