Examining the Project Schedule

The project schedule includes, at a minimum, a date for when the project begins and a date when the project is expected to end. The project schedule is considered proposed until the resources needed to complete the project work are ascertained. In addition to the schedule, the project manager should include all of the supporting details. Project schedules can be presented in many different formats, such as:

• Project network diagram This illustrates the flow of work, the relationship between activities, the critical path, and the expected project end date. PNDs, when used as the project schedule, should have dates associated with each project activity to show when the activity is expected to start and end.

• Bar charts These show the start and end dates for the project and the activity duration against a calendar. They are easy to read. Scheduling bar charts are also called Gantt charts.

• Milestone charts These plot out the high-level deliverables and external interfaces, such as a customer walkthrough, against a calendar. Milestone charts are similar to a Gantt chart, but with less detail regarding individual activities. The following is an example of a milestone chart.

Chapter 6: Managing Project Time

Chapter 6: Managing Project Time

Milestone

July

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Customer sign-off

AT

Architect signature

A

Y

Foundation

A

Framing

/^W

Roofing

Legend

Planned ^^ Actual

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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