Examining How the Processes Interact Pmbok Section

The five project management process groups are not unlike the Rubik's Cube toy; what you do in one area affects all the other areas. In project management, the interactions between the processes are somewhat chronological; but often, the processes are iterative, transient, and allow the project management team to shift from process group to process group. The process groups allow for plenty of overlap throughout the whole project. For example, the extent of the monitoring and controlling processes is directly affected by the planning process group.

You've seen throughout this chapter that the output of one process is often an input to another process group. The planning process group is the best example of this axiom; project plans are created and then executed for each knowledge area. As a project moves through its life cycle, the activities of project management—that is, the 44 individual processes—interact, overlap, and share commonalities that allow the project to move forward. Figure 3-6 demonstrates the concept of how processes overlap within a project. Note that in a multiphase project, these processes can be applied to each individual phase and to the project as a whole.

All of these processes are not needed on every single project—only the processes that are relevant to the specific project are needed. For example, a low priority, simple "Move-Add-Change" (MAC) project within an organization likely won't need to complete all 44 processes in order for the project to be completed successfully. However, a four-year project to build a skyscraper will likely use all 44 processes.

Constraints within a project are often seen as process inputs. Consider any project you've worked on where management has enforced a project deadline. The deadline is

Executing

Executing

Time

Figure 3-6 Process groups naturally interact throughout the project.

Time

Figure 3-6 Process groups naturally interact throughout the project.

a constraint that may not allow the project team to determine the best completion through normal project planning, but rather by working backwards from the deadline. Constraints that serve as inputs to process groups can cause additional risks on schedule and quality, can increase project costs, and may even require the project scope to be reduced to hit the project's target preset end date. No fun for anyone!

Project Management Made Easy

Project Management Made Easy

What you need to know about… Project Management Made Easy! Project management consists of more than just a large building project and can encompass small projects as well. No matter what the size of your project, you need to have some sort of project management. How you manage your project has everything to do with its outcome.

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