Choosing a Source Code Control System

With sufficient ingenuity, you can integrate nearly any source code control system with FogBugz. The minimum requirement is that you need to be able to run some sort of script on every check-in that either does a GET from a specially formatted URL or uses ODBC or OLE DB to insert records into a table. Fog Creek supports five source code control systems in particular. Each has its own pros and cons. Here's some information to help you choose the right one for your own purposes:

• CVS (https://www.cvshome.org/) is an open source project that has been around for quite a while and that has been proven on many applications. You can install a CVS server on many platforms, including Linux, Solaris, and Windows. It's free, and an excellent choice for many projects. Because it's been around for so long, there are many add-on tools available for CVS.

• Perforce (http:/ /www.perforce.com/) runs on practically any modern platform, and has the widest support for graphical clients on various platforms of any source code control system I've seen. It has a particularly well-designed branching model that makes it suitable for complex projects. Perforce is free for up to two users, but starts at $750 per user after that.

• Subversion (http://subversion.tigris.org/) is meant to be a "better CVS." Like CVS, it's an open source project. In particular, some of the underlying operations are faster and more flexible than the CVS equivalents. Subversion isn't as mature as CVS, but it's also a good choice as a free system.

• Vault (http://www.sourcegear.com/vault/index.html) uses Microsoft SQL Server as a data repository for reliability, and it works very well over slow connections. It's also designed to be a painless upgrade for users who are familiar with Visual SourceSafe. It's the only one of these applications that offers built-in support for FogBugz integration. However, in addition to SQL Server licenses, you'll also need to pay $199 per user after the first user.

• Visual SourceSafe (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/previous/ssafe/) is Microsoft's source code control system. It comes with Visual Studio, and it's a good choice for developers who work exclusively within Visual Studio. But it has a reputation for being slow over WAN connections, and it has had data corruption problems in the past (both of these problems are supposed to be fixed in Visual SourceSafe 2005).

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