Coast Guard Example of Requirements

As another example of a statement of requirements, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) in the Department of Transportation produced a specification and statement of work (SOW) for mission-oriented information system engineering (MOISE) [8.9]. A three-digit definition of their requirements is shown in Exhibit 8.5. We note that this specification of requirements is largely related to the procurement of services and thus is different, in general, from the procurement of a system.

Exhibit 8.5: Example of Coast Guard Requirements Format

C.3 REQUIREMENTS

C.3.1 MULTIPLE INFORMATION SYSTEM INTEGRATION

C.3.2 INITIATION AND CONCEPT PHASES

C.3.3 DEFINITION PHASE

C.3.4 DESIGN PHASE

C.3.5 DEVELOPMENT PHASE

C.3.6 DEPLOYMENT PHASE

C.3.7 OPERATIONS PHASE

C.3.S METRICS

C.3.9 MULTIPHASE, CROSS-CUTTING SKILLS AND SERVICES

C.3.10 CONTRACTOR ACQUIRED FEDERAL INFORMATION

PROCESSING (FIP) RESOURCES C.3.11 SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT CENTER C.3.12 CONTRACTOR/USCG MANAGEMENT RELATIONSHIPS C.3.13 CONTRACTOR PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS C.3.14 CONTRACTOR SECURITY REQUIREMENTS

8.5 SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS STATEMENTS

This section identifies certain types of requirements statements and also presents a few examples of specific statements, drawn from government programs.

8.5.1 Types of Requirements

Requirements are sometimes stated in terms of their levels of applicability that, in effect, establish the importance of these requirements to the system user or acquisition agent. An example follows with respect to the weighting or significance of requirements statements [8.10]:

• The most important requirements are stated as ''shall,'' to indicate mandatory requirements.

• The next most important requirements are stated as ''shall, where practicable.''

• The next most important requirements are stated as ''preferred'' or ''should.''

• The next most important requirements are stated as ''may.'' These may be simplified to three- [8.8] and two-level schemes, such as

• Minimum features

• Desirable features

• Highly desirable features

• Minimum or mandatory requirements

• Optional requirements

The preceding requirements represent various ways to designate the importance or weight of these requirements. This gives further guidance to the system developer as to the needs of the customer.

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